The Heroes of the NYC Subway

Our friends over at Expectful do more than empower parents and parents-to-be through meditation aimed at giving a new life the BEST start in life. They remind us, in a time when most other sensory input seems to highlight the opposite, that love is, and will always remain the most powerful instrument of our emotional ensemble. This story of theirs will warm your heart and is a great reminder that a small gesture of kindness and humanity ripples through time, perhaps down generations to come. Thanks Anna, for reminding us the glass is half full! 

 
 

Article by Anna Gannon

I’ve sat on this post for quite sometime wondering when, if ever, I would share it with the world. But, in the wake of the political events these last few weeks and with Thanksgiving right around the corner, I’ve realized that now more than ever, we need to be reminded of the things that unite us as human beings.  

This story is about 15 strangers of different genders, ethnicities, and cultures who literally stood up for kindness so I could sit down while I was pregnant.

If you have ever rode the New York City subway, you have most likely seen a lot of the good and bad that humanity has to offer. Over the past six years riding the train, I have seen my fair share of love, aggression, joy, and frustration. I have witnessed fist fights, crazy dance routines and standing ovations. But, it wasn’t until I became pregnant last year that I saw a new category of humans that ride the subway:

The heroes.

When I was pregnant, I read numerous articles written by other expecting women about their disgust for all the times people didn’t stand up for them on public transit. When I read these posts, there was a part of me that understood their anger. After all, it’s not exactly a cakewalk being pregnant… and when you sit down there’s a giant sense of relief.

And if I’m being completely honest, for a while during my pregnancy, I too started to feel resentment towards the people who weren’t standing up for me. At five months pregnant, I had a belly that to me could no longer be mistaken for a burrito baby and I hadn’t once had someone offer me their seat.

Until one day, when someone did…

Brandon from Astoria, NY

Brandon from Astoria, NY

In the middle of rush hour, on a crowded train, a young man (pictured above) sprung up, apologized for not seeing me sooner and offered me his seat with a giant smile. He didn’t even ask if I wanted to sit, he just got up and insisted that I did.

When I sat down, I looked at him with complete amazement. Here was this man who was kind to me just for the sake of being kind. Suddenly, I didn’t see all the people that didn’t stand up, I just saw him.

It was that moment that I decided I wanted to rewrite what it’s like to be a pregnant woman riding the NYC subway. Not to dismiss or disregard what other woman have went through, but instead to shed light on the people who are standing up instead of the people who aren’t. In short, I wanted to shift our focus off of the negative and onto the positive.

So, that day at five months pregnant, starting with that young man, I asked to take a picture of everyone that stoodup for me. This was a way for me to document the faces of the heroes of the subway, of the people who are putting others before themselves and for the people that did something compassionate for my baby before she was even born.

In sharing this with all of you, I hope to bring awareness around not only standing up to  offer pregnant women or elderly people a seat, but for standing up for anyone that you think could use a seat more than you. Maybe it’s the construction worker who has been working outside all day in the blazing sun or the tired waitress who has been on her feet since 5am. It doesn’t have to be a big belly or a cane that makes you jump from your seat. It can just be that your human instinct tells you that person could need it more than you.

Simple acts of kindness create ripple effects and the more we can focus on the good things we can do for each other, the more compassion and love we can spread into the world.

Majda

Majda

Anonymous Hero

Anonymous Hero

Anonymous Hero

Anonymous Hero

Jascimta Edwards

Jascimta Edwards

Cynthia, Astoria

Cynthia, Astoria

Dan, Astoria

Dan, Astoria

Anonymous Hero

Anonymous Hero

Anonymous Hero

Anonymous Hero

DK, Astoria

DK, Astoria

Nick Paolucci

Nick Paolucci

Alyssa, Astoria

Alyssa, Astoria

Lisa, Brooklyn

Lisa, Brooklyn

Katia & Leilani

Katia & Leilani

Source: http://expectful.com/blog/heroes-nyc-subwa...

Winter Solstice - Rest, Restore, Revitalize

 
Photo by Anna Popovic

Photo by Anna Popovic

 

“Tired eyes on the sunrise, waiting for the Eastern glow.” — Robert Plant

The winter solstice marks the end of the annual cycle of birth, growth, and decline. It is a time of hushed darkness, internal rewiring, and deep meaningful dreams.

The days approaching the winter solstice are of dim, shallow light. The nights are prolonged and “the beads of time pass slow.” Movement that is unhurried, steady, and calculated is characteristic of this time. It is a turning point marked by a bone-penetrating cold that gives birth to warmth again — the midwinter moment from which new life seeds. From this deep mood, the days are reborn and slowly begin to grow. It is Yin transforming into Yang in nature. 

Solstice derives from the Latin “solstitium” which means stopped, stationary, or still. Though there is always movement in nature, to the naked eye, the sun appears to be suspended in the sky during this time. Here in New York, the sun makes a bashful appearance above our horizon for a mere nine hours.

The darkness, slowness, and deepness should encourage us to remain quiet, still, aware, and reflective. This is a time to meditate, for as perspective is most profound in the winter of one’s life, so will be perspective at the end of the seasonal cycle. We are in a space between death and rebirth, the most mysterious place. You can find volumes of knowledge here.

In this time surrounding the winter solstice, go to sleep early and rise later, as hibernation is the way of winter — let the sun’s rays warm the atmosphere before you expose yourself to the elements and let your dreams fill the night. Find respite from your stressors — allow the best potential for your immunity by decreasing its antagonists. Pamper your body, mind, and soul with slow practices — Epsom salt baths, warm massages, hearty broths, meditations, and introduction of rituals. 

Following the solstice will be a new beginning. Continue the practices discovered in your wise, old season. Continue to listen to and nurture yourself. From this point forward, the darkness will recede. Replant yourself into the world on the best platform as the sun slowly begins to take the stage again. 

Oh, and don’t forget… “dance in the dark of night, sing to the mornin’ light.” 

 

Article by Alicia M. Genna, Licensed Acupuncturist
www.acupuncturegreenpoint.com

Source: https://www.acupuncturegreenpoint.com/blog...

Here's an Easy to Make DIY Dry Shampoo using Organic Ingredients and Essential Oils

 
Photo by Alex Holyoake

Photo by Alex Holyoake

 

Ingredients:

***Use cocoa powder for dark hair only. Slowly add it to the dry ingredients as they blend in the food processor until a shade comparable to your hair color is achieved. Do not use cocoa powder for blonde hair.

Directions:

  1. In a food processor, combine all dry ingredients. Blend until well mixed.
  2. Add essential oil blend and pulse until well combined.
  3. Pour mixture into a wide mouth jar.
  4. To use, apply powder to the roots and oily parts of your hair with a make-up brush.

Sacroiliac Joint Correction - A Different Model

 
 

By Marc Heller, DC

So many of our patients have chronic sacroiliac dysfunction. I have written several times about this problem, from several perspectives. This article will describe the work of Richard DonTigny, a physical therapist from Havre, Mont.

DonTigny has developed a home program, a set of basic exercises to reset the patient's sacroiliac (SI) joint, as well as a simplified form of mobilization for the SI joint. DonTigny's work all goes in one direction, taking the anteriorly [forward] rotated ilium in a posterior [backward] direction. DonTigny does this bilaterally on every SI patient. When I was introduced to this work, I was quite skeptical; it seemed too simple. I am still not sure if DonTigny's biomechanics are correct. He tends to see nearly all lower back pain as a result of this pattern of SI dysfunction, while I tend to look more broadly. What I do know is that his procedures (both those the practitioner does and those the patients do for themselves) are very helpful for selected patients.

Many of our low back pain patients return to the office with a recurrence of posterior or anterior innominate [hip] pattern: iliums [the uppermost and largest region of the coxal bone] rotated in the sagittal [left/right] plane. Especially when this malalignment is associated with sacroiliac joint tenderness and other indicators of sacroiliac dysfunction, it tells us the joint is not functioning properly.

DonTigny's basic indicator is tenderness. He checks the medial aspect of the upper PSIS [posterior superior iliac spine - the upper backside ridge of the hip bone], the medial aspect of the ilium at the S3 level, and the PIIS [posterior inferior iliac spine - bony protrusion below the PSIS]. When one or more of these are tender, he feels the SI is involved. He also notes leg length, and tests whether his procedures shorten the leg after correction.

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[To help stabilize this joint, there are several things both patient and practitioner can do: One basic tool is enhancing abdominal tone, particularly of the transverse abs, pelvic floor, and multifidi (which run vertically alongside the spine). Another is the application of massage techniques such as the cross-frictional massage or the Graston Technique which break up adhesions and initiate first-stage healing in the ligaments and tendons surrounding the joint.] [But] what can patients do themselves? DonTigny has developed a series of simple exercises that reset the joint. If the unstable patient will correct their own SI alignment daily, or (better yet) several times a day, they will tend to "hold the adjustment" much better.

Sacroiliac Self-Correction Exercises

What are the basic exercises that reset the SI? The first one will look familiar to those of you familiar with post-isometric relaxation or muscle energy technique. I have reproduced a whole series of pictures, showing different positions in which to do the same basic exercise. The basic routine is to have the patient bring the leg up to the chest, grasp the leg with both arms, and push outward with the leg against resistance. DonTigny recommends pushing outward hard for five to 10 seconds, then alternating legs, doing each side three to five times. Note that this can be done supine, sitting, standing using a chair, or in a doorway.

The second type of exercise is performed supine, with one knee bent, pushing the knee directly along the line of the femur. As you do this, the pelvis will lift on that side, slightly off the surface. You can get a little better motion into the pelvis by wrapping a long belt or strap around the knee, and pushing the knee into the strap (not pictured). Note the sagittal plane torque this is trying to produce in the pelvis. Do this three times on each side, holding for five to 10 seconds at the top. I find that on the involved side, it will feel much stiffer, and it is harder to lift the pelvis freely.

The third set of exercises involves flexing the hip as far as you can, simultaneously pulling it out to the side of the body. A second variation of this is done using a chair or bench and bending forward on the bent- leg side. I would have patients who have possible disc issues, especially those sensitive to flexion, be careful with these by keeping the spine in neutral, or avoiding these exercises altogether.

...

I recognize this is a different model of the SI than most of us use. I recommend you read DonTingny's articles for a deeper understanding of his view of the biomechanics and pathomechanics of the SI joint.

...

Keep an open mind - this is probably nothing like what you usually do to correct the SI joint. I have found these procedures quite effective for selected patients. These techniques seem to work best for the patient with an anterior rotated ilium, found usually on the right, when the right SI also is fixated.

Link to Original Article: http://www.dynamicchiropractic.com/mpacms/dc/article.php?id=50535